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Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

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Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby skunk » Fri Jun 16, 2017 11:35 am

I want to verify that I am understanding some things correctly here...

For reference, the G major scale:
Code: Select all
G A B C D E F# G
1 2 3 4 5 6 7  8


In the key of G if a song contains chords for 1, 4, and 5 on the Nasvhille number system, then the chords would be:
G(1), C(4), and D(5)

So let's say we want to play the same song in the key of A. Would the chords then be?:
A(1), D(4), and E(5)

And another example in the key of B, would the chords be?:
B(1), E(4), and F#(5)
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby skunk » Fri Jun 16, 2017 3:03 pm

The internet answered my question...

Found this handy dandy cheat sheet:
http://www.danwilt.com/the-nashville-number-system-chart-for-bands/
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby markrocka » Thu Jul 06, 2017 1:32 pm

You got it. Also, this is why the Circle of Fifths is such an awesome tool! You just pick any key on the circle and your 4 and 5 chords are to the left and right of the root chord you picked.

Also, let's say you're in G. You look clockwise and see that the 5th is a D. Now, if you play long enough, you'll find some songs that go to an A before going to the D. For the longest time, I thought the A chord was the 2 in your Nashville Scale above, but it's not. The A chord doesn't fall in the G major scale because it contains a C#, and that's not in the G major scale.

As it turns out, the A is the "fifth of the fifth." That's important because it explains why it sounds good to go from G to A to D. Your ear wants to hear that A resolved, which is accomplished by switching to D.

I can't recommend using the circle of fifths highly enough. I wish I would have known about it back when I started learning.
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby 5stringpreacher » Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:15 pm

markrocka wrote: ... For the longest time, I thought the A chord was the 2 in your Nashville Scale above, but it's not. The A chord doesn't fall in the G major scale because it contains a C#, and that's not in the G major scale. ...


So then what is the 2 chord? Is it A minor?
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby mreisz » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:13 am

You are correct sir. The 2, 3 and 6 are minor. I am sure there are exceptions (like key changes or oddball songs). But that is the "normal" way of things.
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby 5stringpreacher » Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:50 pm

And is the 7th always a diminished chord? Or is that just in a G scale?
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Re: Nasvhille Notation and Changing Keys Question

Postby markrocka » Wed Jul 12, 2017 5:17 pm

It's always the diminished chord. If you haven't already, check out Ben's videos with Alan Munde titled "Fretboard Geofraphy." It's really good stuff and gives a great visual of all of the chords made by the major scale in any key.
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