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Scale Pattern Question

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Scale Pattern Question

Postby mswhat » Wed Oct 03, 2012 3:51 pm

If you take a major guitar chord shape, such as the F barre chord shape, is it true that the scale pattern will be the same no matter where on the fret board you make the barre chord?

I realize the individual notes will be different based on the scale (ie: where you are on the fretboard) but the pattern itself seems to remain the same anywhere. Anybody confirm?

And would that be the same for the C shape and A shape chords?

If so, that's pretty cool.
Mike
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby ldpayton » Wed Oct 03, 2012 7:07 pm

Sounds like you got it right to me. Just memorize the pattern for each chord shape and you've got a good start on mapping the fretboard. Thinking about scales out of chord shapes helps if you're trying to outline the chord progression while you play a break, also.
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby verneq » Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:48 pm

You got it. Also the scale pattern will contain, in the case of the key of F, patterns of the chords F, Bb, C or in the key of G patterns of G, C, D.

Sounds like the next step is arpeggios (or notes of the chords played around the neck) When Ben gets his family stuff sorted out, maybe an arpeggio lesson/exercises for Gtr and Mando. They are a great way to build solos and get your self out of a jam when playing a tune you dont really know to well.
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby mswhat » Thu Oct 11, 2012 2:56 pm

verneq wrote:You got it. Also the scale pattern will contain, in the case of the key of F, patterns of the chords F, Bb, C or in the key of G patterns of G, C, D.

Sounds like the next step is arpeggios (or notes of the chords played around the neck) When Ben gets his family stuff sorted out, maybe an arpeggio lesson/exercises for Gtr and Mando. They are a great way to build solos and get your self out of a jam when playing a tune you dont really know to well.


I just read Ben's post about his dad's health issues and pray that his dad will recover. My dad has been through a tough year and I know how trying that can be.

Arpeggio exercises would be great, I'd be all over some more "theory" oriented lessons.

I've been working on some praise and worship songs for church, which have a lot of "5" chords (C5, B5, etc) and I can make them and work with them I don't understand why they're called 5s. Is it taking out the 5th note of the scale (or adding it)?
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby ldpayton » Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:29 am

I believe "5" chords are indicating that the 3rd is left out, so the chord is just the root and the fifth. In rock music, a 5 chord is called a power chord. Ben's bluegrass G chord is a 5 chord, because he leaves out the B note and plays only the G and D notes.
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby mreisz » Sat Oct 13, 2012 9:06 pm

Since it's been answered, I wouldn't normally post, but Larry said, "I believe." He is correct (as always)... the only notes in a 5 chord are the root and the five. As Larry said in a G5, that would be G and Ds across the whole chord. In a C5, it would be C and G's. They are used a great deal in praise music. G5, C9 (or C2), Em7 and Dsus4 will get you through a fairly huge amount of praise songs. Many praise players leave the 3rd fret of the B and high E down through the whole song to act as a drone (which leads to the chord progression I previously mentioned).
Mike

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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby ldpayton » Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:06 am

I use "I believe" as my standard disclaimer, since I've learned there's a good chance someone will come along behind me with a better answer. (doh! It's happened again.)
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby mswhat » Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:40 am

Thanks boys! As usual, great input. That makes perfect sense on the "5"chords. I had looked around online and watched some very informative youtube vids but it never sunk in until now.

Mike
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby mreisz » Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:08 am

A five chord is kind of interesting in that it is neither major nor minor. Instead of being a "happy" or "sad" chord, I guess a 5 chord is kind of ambiguous.
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Re: Scale Pattern Question

Postby verneq » Mon Oct 15, 2012 6:13 pm

Tru
mreisz wrote:A five chord is kind of interesting in that it is neither major nor minor. Instead of being a "happy" or "sad" chord, I guess a 5 chord is kind of ambiguous.


You are right on that, the "5" chords are also great in fast chord changes, or just getting yourself out of trouble in a Jam (like a fiddle tune you dont know) since they can sub for either a minor or a major chords.
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